Oracle

Oracle Speeds up Cloud Growth with Data Center Expansion

Oracle is planning to come up with its own brand of newer and fresher technologies to compete with the bigwigs of the cloud world Amazon, Microsoft and Google. The importance of growing a cloud-focused enterprise is one of the main reasons behind Oracle’s new push to reinvent its technology machines. Traditionally known for its strong database technologies, Oracle’s aggressive approach to extend its data center capabilities around the world is a sign of the times to come.

During cloud transformation journeys, companies always look to integrate systems and data that are critical to build operations. The changing market perception on cloud has helped business to take bolder decisions with cloud and technology vendors. This is where the opportunity lies for Cloud superpowers like Oracle, as it gears up to sell massive arrays of servers, storage, and networking to businesses at relatively low costs.

Speaking to Fortune, Mark Hurd, CEO, Oracle said: “If I have two-times faster computers, I don’t need as many data centres. If I can speed up the database, maybe I need one fourth as many data centres. I can go on and on about how tech drives this.

“Our core advantage is what we’ve said all along, which is that it’s about the intellectual property and the software, not about who’s got the most real estate.

Recent reports have suggested that Oracle is trying to acquire Accenture, which only few were able to believe. Both Oracle and Accenture have clearly denied any claims of future partnership or acquisition. But the whole IT industry was up in anticipation given the seriousness of the impact if such a deal was actually made. Competitors like IBM have hugely benefitted firm accusations of companies like Bluewolf Group, the largest service partner to Salesforce (CRM). So, it would not be really strange if Oracle walks along the same lines.

However, Oracle wants to thread its own path in the cloud world by relying more on its unique service model and powerful public cloud configurations. Oracle’s Hurd said: The third largest database in the world is IBM DB2, and it’s been going out of business for 20 years. If it was so easy to replace databases, DB2 market share would be zero.”